Clarence Thomas will not teach at George Washington University: NPR

Following the decision of the Supreme Court to cancel Face off against WadeGeorge Washington University Law School received calls to remove Judge Clarence Thomas and cancel a seminar he was teaching.

Erin Schaaf, The New York Times/AP


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Erin Schaaf, The New York Times/AP


Following the decision of the Supreme Court to cancel Face off against WadeGeorge Washington University Law School received calls to remove Judge Clarence Thomas and cancel a seminar he was teaching.

Erin Schaaf, The New York Times/AP

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has told George Washington University that he will not return to teach at the university’s law school this fall. This decision was made after the protest of the students against the annulment decision of the Supreme Court Face off against Wade.

Thomas told the school that he would not be available for the constitutional seminar he was expected to co-teach. Since 2011, he has been teaching this course at the Washington DC School of Law.

“Students were immediately notified of Justice Thomas’ decision by his co-counsel that he will offer the seminar this fall,” GWU spokesman Joshua Grossman said in a statement to NPR on Thursday.

Thomas faced backlash from some GWU law students after voting with the Supreme Court’s conservative majority to overturn the 1973 landmark. Face off against Wade A decision that made abortion a legal right for Americans.

“We cannot be an institution that can pressure you to give you the results you want,” Thomas told a group of mostly lawyers and judges at the 11th Judicial Conference in Atlanta in May. NBC News reported.

Since the court’s ruling, “we have heard from members of our community who have expressed their deep opposition to this decision.”

The university called They wrote to terminate Thomas and cancel the seminary he was teaching.

“The views of Justice Thomas do not reflect the views of George Washington University or its law school,” Brice and Matthews said. In addition, Justice Thomas, like all faculty members of our university, enjoys academic freedom and freedom of speech and research.

The law school additionally cited the faculty’s academic freedom guidelines, which say the university must not protect its students from “ideas and opinions they find objectionable, distasteful, or even deeply offensive.”

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