In Pictures: Chicagoans Celebrate Diversity at Disability Pride Parade: ‘It’s a Healing Event’

It’s been a year since Sofia Sarabia suffered a stroke that left her with physical and verbal challenges.

His wife, Alicia Vega, said it was “unexpected and unjustified”. “Before that, she was healthy. So this year, we learned how to navigate the world.”

On Saturday, Sarabia, who had a transgender pride flag draped in her wheelchair, and Vega, who wore a rainbow flag like a cloak, marched in the 19th annual Disability Parade for the first time.

Sarabia, writing on a piece of paper to help her communicate, wrote the word “enjoy” to describe her experience of marching in the show.

“I know she really wanted to be here because she wasn’t ashamed of her physical and verbal challenges, and she wanted to celebrate life,” Vega added.

Alicia Vega, left, bows to hug Sofia Sarabia, right, as she walks the 19th annual Disability Pride Parade in the loop, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. Vega and Sarabia, who are married, learn how to sail around the world after Sarabia had a stroke. cerebral palsy last year, Vega said. This year’s parade, which is its first in-person comeback since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, is themed “Back and Stronger Than Ever.”

The Disability Pride Parade, which has taken a virtual form for the past two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic, returned in person Saturday morning. The parade attracted several hundred people who walked from South Plymouth Court and West Van Buren Street to Daly Plaza in the Loop.

“Because the last two years of COVID-19 have been so hard on everyone, it’s good to have this show for people with disabilities so we can all support each other, so we can all encourage each other to continue to face the ongoing challenges that are ongoing,” said Alec Kapakungan, Leader The march and patient ambassador at Shriners Children’s in Chicago, “We Have in Our Lives.”

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Alec Kapakongan, Grand Marshal of the 19th Annual Disability Pride Parade and Shriners Children’s Chicago’s Patient Ambassador, waves as he rides in a convertible in the Loop, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. This year’s parade, which is the first in-return people since 2019 Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, under the heading “Back and Stronger Than Ever”.

“[The Disability Pride Parade is] For people who may not have this community in their area, in their lives. “It’s an opportunity for them to meet other people with disabilities who really have a sense of belonging,” Kapakongan said.

As show-goers walked in, Patrick cheered and filmed near the pier.

“It’s a recovery event, in that we don’t recover from our disability,” Patrick said. “We really celebrate them and they are an important part of our human diversity, you know.”

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Rahnee Patrick cheers for parade-goers during the 19th annual Disability Pride Parade in the Loop, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. This year’s parade, which is its first in-person comeback since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, is its theme “Back and Stronger Than Ever” gone.” | Pat Nabong / The Sun Times

Pat Nabong / Sun Times, Pat Nabong / Sun Times

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Wilbur Pugh, who walks with Envision Unlimited, dances during the 19th Annual Disability Pride Parade in the loop, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. This year’s parade, which is its first personal comeback since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, is themed “He appeared stronger than ever.”

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Parade-goers hold a sign that reads, “This is a Disabled Delight” as they march at the 19th Annual Disability Pride Parade in the loop, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. This year’s parade, which is its first in-person return since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic , under the title “He appeared stronger than ever.”

Pat Nabong / Sun Times, Pat Nabong / Sun Times

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Parade-goers hold hands as they march at the 19th Annual Parade of Disability Pride in the Loop, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. This year’s parade, which is its first in-person comeback since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, is its theme “Back and Stronger Than Any time ago.”

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A parade-goer holds a fan that reads “I’m a Disability Pride Parade in the Loop” during the 19th annual Disability Pride Parade in the Loop, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. This year’s parade, which is its first in-person return since 2019 Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, under the title “He’s Back and Stronger Than Ever.”

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A visitor to the parade rides in front of the Shriners riding miniature cars during the 19th annual Disability Pride parade in Loeb, Saturday morning, July 22, 2022. This year’s parade, which is its first in-person return since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, is themed “He appeared stronger than ever.”



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